1787John Adams | President

All the perplexities, confusion and distress in America rise, not from defects in their Constitution or Confederation, not from want of honor or virtue, so much as from downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit and circulation.

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1795James Madison | President

Of all the enemies to public liberty war is, perhaps, the most to be dreaded... War is the parent of armies; from these proceed debts and taxes; and armies, and debts, and taxes are the known instruments for bringing the many under the domination of the few... No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.

The management of foreign relations appears to be the most susceptible of abuse, of all the trusts committed to a Government, because they can be concealed or disclosed, or disclosed in such parts & at such times as will best suit particular views; and because the body of the people are less capable of judging & are more under the influence of prejudices, on that branch of their affairs, than of any other. Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions agst. danger real or pretended from abroad.

Mr. MADISON, was not a little surprised to hear this implicit confidence urged by a member who on all occasions, had inculcated so strongly, the political depravity of men, and the necessity of checking one vice and interest by opposing to them another vice & interest... all men having power ought to be distrusted to a certain degree.

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1798George Washington | President

It is not my intention to doubt that the doctrine of the Illuminati and the principles of Jacobinism had not spread in the United States. On the contrary, no one is more satisfied of this fact than I am.

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1800Napoleon | Emperor

...The Emperor turns away, and leaves the prisoner to his doom. To Champagny, who is present, he talks for a long time about the Illuminates. Then, with a sudden transition he says: "We must make peace..."

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1807Thomas Jefferson | President

Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms (of government) those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.

I sincerely believe, with you, that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies.

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1820James Mill | Political Philosopher

The benefits of the representative system are lost, in all cases in which the interests of the choosing body are not the same with those of the community.

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1844Benjamin Disraeli | Prime Minister

The world is governed by very different personages from what is imagined by those who are not behind the scenes.

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1852William Gladstone | Prime Minister

From the time I took office as Chancellor of the Exchequer I began to learn that the State held, in the face of the Bank and the City, an essentially false position as to finance. The Government was not to be the substantive power, but was to leave the Money Power supreme and unquestioned.

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1880John Swinton | managing editor, New York Times

There is no such thing, at this date of the world's history, in America, as an independent press. You know it and I know it. There is not one of you who dares to write your honest opinions, and if you did, you know beforehand that it would never appear in print...

...We are the tools and vassals of rich men behind the scenes. We are the jumping jacks they pull the strings and we dance. Our talents, our possibilities and our lives are all the property of other men. We are intellectual prostitutes.

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1881James Garfield | President

By the experience of commercial nations in all ages it has been found that gold and silver afford the only safe foundation for a monetary system... The chief duty of the National Government in connection with the currency of the country is to coin money and declare its value.

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